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It’s still 2014. We’re still reading good books.

posted: , by Elizabeth Hartsig
tags: Recommended Reads | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Art & Culture
An illustrated quotation that says "We realise the importance of our voices only when we are silenced."

A  pertinent quotation from “I Am Malala.”

A photograph of 17-year-old Malala Yousafzi.

Malala Yousafzi.

It’s still 2014. And we’re still reading good books. (Books that just happen to have been written by women: see my earlier report on the Vida Count and #readwomen2014 here).

In a year of special focus on reading women, it’s meaningful to hear this month that 17-year-old Malala Yousafzi has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2014 (shared with Kailash Satyarthi). Yousafzi’s memoir, “I Am Malala,” tells her incredible story as a passionate advocate for education for girls. Find it in print at PPL here, or check it out as an ebook!

A rich crop of other memoirs and essays are being published in the last months of 2014. As a City of Readers team member here at the library, I’m engaged with many of the conversations being sparked around new (and old) books. Some issues are timeless: is a writer-who-happens-to-be-a-woman a woman writer, or just…a writer? Authors Cheryl Strayed and Benjamin Moser tackle these and other ideas in a recent New York Times Book Review article, “Is This a Golden Age for Women Essayists?”

To help you celebrate the Golden Age, here are some of Portland Public Library’s own New Nonfiction releases. Click on the titles below for more info:

downloadThe opposite of loneliness Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meghan Daum, “The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion”

Lena Dunham, “Not That Kind of Girl”

Roxane Gay,  “Bad Feminist”

Amy Poehler, “Yes Please”

Marina Keegan, “The Opposite of Loneliness”

Interestingly…the only woman shortlisted for the National Book Award in Nonfiction this year is Roz Chast, for “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?”

If you hop on MaineCat with your PPL library card, you can request other hit essay collections from 2014:  Rebecca Solnit’s “Men Explain Things to Me,”  or Leslie Jamison’s “The Empathy Exams.” Pick them up at the PPL Branch of your choice.

things-that-are

The Year of Magical Thinkingmen we reaped

 

 

 

 

 

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me

 

 

Even more ideas for recent or classic essays/nonfiction/memoirs: Zadie Smith’s “Changing My Mind,” Sloane Crosley’s “How Did You Get This Number,” Elif Batuman’s “The Possessed,”  Nora Ephron’s “I Feel Bad About My Neck,” bell hooks’ “Appalachian Elegy,” Marilynne Robinson’s “When I Was a Child I Read Books,”  Rachel Maddow’s “Drift,” Jesmyn Ward’s “Men We Reaped,” Dorothy Allison’s “Two or Three Things I Know For Sure,” Arundhati Roy’s “The Cost of Living,” Maya Angelou’s “Mom & Me & Mom,” Katie Roiphe’s “In Praise of Messy Lives,” Joan Didion’s “The Year of Magical Thinking,” Jennifer Finney Boylan’s “She’s Not There,” Susan Sontag’s “Against Interpretation,” Anne Carson’s “Plainwater,” Jenny Lawson’s “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened,” Ntozake Shange’s “Lost in Language and Sound: Or, How I Found My Way to the Arts,” Annie Dillard’s “Teaching a Stone to Talk,” Michelle Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow,” Cheryl Strayed’s “Wild,” Alison Bechdel’s “Fun Home,” Amy Leach’s “Things That Are,” and Mindy Kaling’s  “Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? And other concerns.”

This list should stop somewhere…but it feels like a good thing that it could go on and on! Happy reading.

(For more recommendations, to ask questions, or to request books and other materials over the phone, please contact your branch, the Reader’s Advisory Desk at the Main Library at 871-1700 ext. 705, or the Reference Desk at the Main Library at 871-1700 ext. 725).


eBook Privacy and the Adobe Controversy

posted: , by Ellen Gilliam
tags: About the Library | Library Collections | Online Services | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors

Privacy is one of the main tenets of public libraries, so the recently exposed security concerns for patrons using Adobe Digital Editions to access library eBooks is very troubling to us at PPL.

You can read more about the developments here and here, but in short, if you are using the latest version of Adobe Digital Editions software, information about any eBooks on your computer delivered in the ePub format is being transmitted to Adobe in plain text format and is potentially visible to anyone who can read the stream of data. 

NOTE: PPL’s eBook service is provided by Overdrive. Read below OverDrive’s statement about Adobe Digital Editions privacy concerns

UPDATE: 2:30 PM 10/10/14

In response to concerns expressed by our library partners about the Adobe privacy situation, OverDrive CEO Steve Potash met with Adobe management at Frankfurt Book Fair today. Adobe reported that next week they will release an update to Adobe Digital Editions 4 to address the known issues.

To clarify, this affects only Adobe Digital Editions 4 for Windows and Mac. Adobe reports that the issue does not affect third party apps in any way, including the OverDrive app. Adobe reports that the issue is not present with Adobe Digital Editions 3 or previous versions of Adobe Digital Editions.

For full text: http://blogs.overdrive.com/front-page-library-news/2014/10/09/overdrives-statement-about-adobe-digital-editions-privacy-concerns/

If you are concerned about your eBook privacy, we recommend that you uninstall Adobe Digital Editions version 4 from all of your devices immediately. You can still read eBook content online, or contact the library for print options. The Kindle app for accessing the Amazon format of eBooks is available to mobile and tablet users, and materials read directly through the Overdrive app are excluded from this breach of privacy.

We have expressed our dismay to our eBook provider, and have asked them to advocate for the principles of privacy that libraries are pledged to uphold. We are committed to challenging anyone who confuses “privacy policies” with “invasive policies.” Please contact the library if you have any additional questions or concerns about this issue.


Professional Hockey History in Portland

posted: , by Abraham
tags: Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | Portland History

As the famous Stompin’ Tom Connors song goes, “the good old hockey game is the best game you can name,” and many local fans know this tune from our visits to our local arenas. Portland’s Cross Insurance Arena, the renamed and refurbished Cumberland County Civic Center, has been home to the Maine Mariners of yore (1977-1992), and currently the Portland Pirates (since 1993).  Years of exciting games and American Hockey League (AHL) Calder Cup Championships have been won by our local teams. With the start of the new 2014-15 season, here’s a salute to professional hockey in the Greater Portland area.

Ice hockey has been played in the Portland area for much longer than professional leagues have been here- especially in local colleges (notably the University of Maine and Bowdoin College), as well as unorganized pond hockey. Before the arrival of the Maine Mariners (1977), in the brand-new Civic Center, an influential team was filling the stands in Lewiston: The Maine Nordiques.

74mainor-program

In the early and mid-1970s, Portland didn’t have an ice arena large enough for a professional team. The Nordiques’ success prompted the game you see in the 2 Portland Public Library archival photos immediately below, taken on October 23, 1974. The Maine Nordiques (affiliated with the Québec Nordiques) took on the Flames- and won the game handily, 11-2, at Riverside Arena in the North Deering section of Portland. 1,200 fans were at that game, and in retrospect we can imagine the turnout helped inspire the idea of building a professional arena for a downtown team!

126841 10

Maine Nordiques vs. Atlantic Flames, at Riverside in Portland.

A bit of sports trivia in the photo below: the Flames forward being thwarted by the Nordiques’ defense is
Mike O’Connell, who later played for- and coached the Boston Bruins.

126841 8 O_Connell
The Maine Mariners, based in Portland, won 3 Calder Cup championships and many playoff wins, in their 15 seasons here. Their affliates included the Philadelphia Flyers, the New Jersey Devils, and the Boston Bruins. In the program below, you may notice the “black and gold,” from the Mariners’ latter parent NHL team. In 1993, the Bruins moved the franchise to Providence, Rhode Island.

Mariners Score

The two Library archival photos below are from the Maine Mariners’ first Calder Cup title.

1979 EX 05_12 15

The Maine Mariners celebrate their first Calder Cup, 1978.

1979 EX 05_12 6
Fortunately, Portland hockey fans didn’t have to wait long for a new team to play here in the city. Just a year after the Maine Mariners became the Providence Bruins, the Portland Pirates began in fall 1993.

Pirates Parchment
The Portland Pirates, originally affiliated with the NHL’s Washington Capitals flew out of the gates with their over-the-top home games and the Calder Cup, in 1994. Their current affiliate (after the Capitals, and the Buffalo Sabres) is the NHL’s Phoenix Coyotes. The Pirates’ 2014-15 season begins this week.

Just below are some Library archival photos from the Calder Cup final in 1994. In 6 games, Portland defeated the Moncton Hawks.

1994 PH 05_30 19


Above photo: Todd Nelson of the Pirates sends one in, with the Hawks in pursuit.

Below: Pirates goalie Olaf Kolzig makes a stop on Dan Bylsma of the Hawks.
(More trivia: Bylsma went on to coach the Stanley Cup-winning Pittsburgh Penguins.)

1994 PH 05_30 12

 

1994 PH 05_30 9 SM
The Portland Pirates with the Calder Cup, on the ice on Free Street, and
(below) in front of Portland City Hall during the city’s festive parade and rally.

Press Herald June 2 1994 SM

Some Portland-area hockey memorabilia:
The Nordiques, the Mariners, the Pirates,
and regional NHL favorites- the Bruins.

IMG_0595 SM
 

 

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