Some patrons may be having trouble using our Marvel! database resources from home. We are working on the problem with the state and hope to have this resolved soon. The Reference Desk may be able to offer some assistance (871-1700 x725). Our apologies for any inconvenience.
X

Life of the Library

What’s new?


Talking about Race

posted: , by Kim Simmons
tags: Programs & Events | Adults | Art & Culture | Government

On September 9th at 7pm, PPL will host “Tell Me the Truth: Exploring the Heart of Cross-Racial Conversations” -  FMI, click here.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

Shay Stewart-Bouley (black) and Debby Irving (white) as they talk about racism’s impact on their lives and how conversation has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st century racial dynamics.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

Shay Stewart-Bouley (black) and Debby Irving (white) as they talk about racism’s impact on their lives and how conversation has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st century racial dynamics.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

Shay Stewart-Bouley (black) and Debby Irving (white) as they talk about racism’s impact on their lives and how conversation has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st century racial dynamics.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

Shay Stewart-Bouley (black) and Debby Irving (white) as they talk about racism’s impact on their lives and how conversation has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st century racial dynamics.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

Shay Stewart-Bouley (black) and Debby Irving (white) as they talk about racism’s impact on their lives and how conversation has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st century racial dynamics.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

Shay Stewart-Bouley (black) and Debby Irving (white) as they talk about racism’s impact on their lives and how conversation has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st century racial dynamics.

Though conversation is a primary way human beings think together, fear of talking about race prevents us from using this critical tool. Shay and Debby will explore the common fears and pitfalls of cross-racial conversation that keep people isolated in their own racial groups, at the expense of personal, professional, and societal growth. They’ll also help audience members understand how interpersonal social patterns hinder organizations from living up to their own ideals for diversity.

Finally, Shay and Debby will offer suggestions to create racial justice habits that can move us from isolated events to sustainable connections.

- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/tell-truth-exploring-heart-cross-racial-conversations/#sthash.yhDlgLhx.dpuf

For many of us, talking about race feels difficult.  It is easy to make a mistake and many of us are uncomfortable being vulnerable in public conversations.  Yet, in 2014, it is relatively essential that we develop our capacity to understand race as an historical concept, to understand disparities in health, economics, etc. as they relate to race, and that we engage in conversations with those who identify as differently from us in term of race and ethnicity – to share our own racialized stories and to hear those of others.   We need to collectively address racism to uphold the core values of Democracy, and we can’t address racism without more easily talking about race.

Pew Research conducted a survey this week, examining individuals’ response to the death of Michael Brown and subsequent protest activity in Ferguson MO and found that there are “stark racial differences” in how the events are understood.

 

This difference in perception and response reveals rich opportunities for civil and curious conversation, yet such conversations can also be challenging.  We invite you to explore the Choose Civility collection, and recommended links and books to learn more about race and racism in the United States in preparation for our upcoming 9/9 program “Tell Me the Truth: Exploring the Heart of Cross-Racial Conversations”  (7:00pm, Rines Auditorium, Main Library)


FLASH book sale

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Programs & Events | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | News

Did you miss the Friends of PPL book sale last month? Don’t despair! Portland Public Library is holding a supplemental book sale on Saturday, July 26 from 9 am – noon. We’ll have more than 5,000 items to choose from, all in good condition on a wide variety of topics and many with recent publication dates. This is a great chance to add some variety to your shelves, stock up for a house-bound relative or friend, or freshen up a collection.

100% of the proceeds from the book sale benefit PPL’s collections, programs, and outreach. This is a CASH ONLY sale. Hardcovers will be $1 each, and softcovers 50 cents each. Lovers of old cassette audio books and VCR material, we’ve got some oldie-but-goodie gems in the sale for you, too, at unbeatable prices.

This CASH ONLY sale will take place at PPL’s new off-site collections management facility at 1000 Riverside Street on Saturday, July 26 from 9 am to noon. There is ample parking on site. Our friends at Maine Historical Society will be holding a tag sale that day on site as well, with the sale of donated items benefiting MHS’s education and outreach programs. We know many library fans are also history enthusiasts, so you may find some bonus treasures on Saturday. (Details at https://www.mainehistory.org/programs_events.shtml)

We look forward to seeing you! Questions about the book sale? Contact Emily at 207-871-1700 ext. 759 or levine@portland.lib.me.us


Louise Penny to speak about book “How the Light Gets In”

posted: , by Rachael Weyand
tags: Programs & Events | Adults | Art & Culture

Tickets are $10

July 31 update: Online sales have now closed. A limited number of physical tickets are available at the Main Library lending desk and at Longfellow Books for purchase. Only 100 tickets will be sold at the event when the doors open at First Parish Church at 6:30 pm. If you have will-call tickets, please check in at the door at First Parish Church at 6:30 pm.

 

louise pennyPortland Public Library and Longfellow Books present a book talk and signing by Louise Penny on Thursday, July 31st at 7:00pm at First Parish in Portland.  Penny will speak about her newest in the Gamache series, How the Light Gets In.  Ticket holders will receive 20% off one Louise Penny book at the event. Tickets are available online at Brown Paper Tickets http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/735793 or at Longfellow Books and the Main Library in Monument Square.

About the book
Christmas is approaching, and in Québec it’s a time of dazzling snowfalls, bright lights, and gatherings with friends in front of blazing hearths. But shadows are falling on the usually festive season for Chief Inspector Armand Gamache. Most of his best agents have left the Homicide Department, his old friend and lieutenant Jean-Guy Beauvoir hasn’t spoken to him in months, and hostile forces are lining up against him. When Gamache receives a message from Myrna Landers that a longtime friend has failed to arrive for Christmas in the village of Three Pines, he welcomes the chance to get away from the city. Mystified by Myrna’s reluctance to reveal her friend’s name, Gamache soon discovers the missing woman was once one of the most famous people not just in North America, but in the world, and now goes unrecognized by virtually everyone except the mad, brilliant poet Ruth Zardo.

As events come to a head, Gamache is drawn ever deeper into the world of Three Pines. Increasingly, he is not only investigating the disappearance of Myrna’s friend but also seeking a safe place for himself and his still-loyal colleagues. Is there peace to be found even in Three Pines, and at what cost to Gamache and the people he holds dear?

About the Author
Louise Penny is a Canadian author of mystery novels set in the Canadian province of Quebec centered on the work of Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté du Québec. Penny’s first career was as a radio broadcaster for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. After she turned to writing, she won numerous awards for her work, including the Agatha Award for best mystery novel of the year for four consecutive years and the Anthony Award for two novels. Her novels have been published in 23 languages.

View Posts by Date:
Filter Posts:
Connect with the Library: