All Library locations will be closed Monday, Sept. 1st, in observance of Labor Day. We will re-open for regular hours on Tuesday, Sept. 2.
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Life of the Library

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Munjoy Observer (1962-1965) added to Digital Commons

posted: , by Gabrielle Daniello
tags: Adults | Portland History

In 1962, the city of Portland launched its third urban renewal project – the Munjoy South Urban Renewal Project. Intended to address what was perceived as “urban blight,” to use the language of the day, the project encompassed 79 acres of land between Congress, Mountfort, and Fore Streets, and the Eastern Promenade, and identified buildings and blocks that would be demolished entirely, as well as individual structures that needed to be improved or rehabilitated. The agency that oversaw this project, the Portland Renewal Authority, published a monthly (more or less) newsletter called the Munjoy Observer. Through the newsletter, the agency hoped to provide information and address concerns about the project. Today, the newsletters provide an interesting look at how the city coped with change fifty years ago.

Munjoy observer_Summer 1963_1 The Portland Room has digitized our issues of this newsletter and uploaded them to Digital Commons.

To read individual issues, click here: http://digitalcommons.portlandlibrary.com/citydocs_pra_newsletters/

 


Woman’s Literary Union on Digital Commons

posted: , by Gabrielle Daniello
tags: Adults | Portland History

The Woman’s Literary Union was organized in 1889. The organization’s stated goal was to promote the intellectual life of its members through lectures, entertainment, and community work. The Portland Room has a small collection of pamphlets and ephemera pertaining to this organization, which we have digitized and uploaded to the library’s Digital Commons platform: http://digitalcommons.portlandlibrary.com/wlu/

Though small in scope, the collection offers tantalizing glimpses into the lives of some of the city’s women. It also provides opportunities to explore other online historical resources.

receipt

Annual Dues Receipt

For example, Mrs. Hubbard’s annual dues receipt gives her address. A photograph of her house as it appeared in 1924, a year after the date on this receipt, can be seen on the Maine Memory Network web site. The digitization of the 1924 tax photographs was a collaborative project involving the City of Portland, the Maine Historical Society, and the Portland Public Library.

Gail Laughlin, whose name appears on a 1926 list of officers, had an illustrious career as a lawyer, women’s rights advocate, and politician. You can see census entries and city directory listings for her by accessing Ancestry.com through the Portland Public Library’s computers (http://www.portlandlibrary.com/research/) (Incidentally, you can also find a photograph of her house in the 1924 tax records collection.)

We did not pursue every lead in the collection or track down every name. We leave that for other researchers. We just hope the collection will spark interest or get you curious about other historical collections. As always, call us (207-871-1700 x747), email us (portlandroom@portland.lib.me.us), or stop by if you are curious about Portland history or library resources!

The Portland Room is open Monday-Thursday 10am-7pm and Friday 10am-6pm.


June programming for Pride Month

posted: , by Kathleen Spahn
tags: Exhibits & Displays | Library Collections | Programs & Events | Recommended Reads | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | Portland History

prideby Elizabeth Hartsig

The Portland Public Library is celebrating Pride Month with exciting and informative exhibits, films, and events. Here’s a run-down of what’s going on with Pride at PPL in June, as well as some resources you can access all year round:

Wednesday, June 18, Portland Public Library is partnering with Portland Pride to bringPride Maine LGBT History: Life and Activism in the 1970s,” a panel discussion and exhibit. Hear from the early LGBT activists whose efforts to organize polarized Maine and made national news.

Saturday, June 21, look for PPL’s Bookmobile in the Pride Parade! Volunteers from the PPL staff and community will be marching with the Bookmobile and passing out bookmarks with lists of great LGBT-related reads. We’ll have a special display of PPL’s Pride-related materials on the Bookmobile ready to be checked out when the parade stops at Deering Oaks.

If you duck away from the crowds on June 21, the Main Library will be having a Pride Film Festival, showing classic titles all day in the Rines Auditorium.

Pride-related films will also be showing on Thursday nights at the Main Library each week in June.

In addition to our calendar of special events and programming, Pride Month is a great time to explore the library’s historic and up-to-the-minute collections.

In the Portland Room, you can check out “Our Paper: A Voice for Lesbians and Gay Males in Maine,” a publication preserved on microfilm (1983-1990). Or if you just want to hop on our website and are curious about, say, Pride Week in Portland in 1996, take a look at Casco Bay Weekly. (In addition to the bold typography of CBW’s June 13 cover, there’s a thoughtful article called “Pride 1996” on p. 8 with great black-and-white photographs). You can see digital scans of each Casco Bay Weekly issue published from 1988 to 2004 at PPL’s Digital Commons.

Another archive we’re tapping into during Pride Week is the Portland Press Herald Still-Film Negative Collection. A display of photographs from past Pride Weeks (including some shots from Portland’s very first Pride Parade in 1987) will grace the hallways of the Main Library around the Lewis Gallery.

Our staff have created handy catalog lists of Pride-related resources from throughout the library for Children, Teens, and Adults (which you can check out any month of the year!).

●    Youth Services offers Rainbow Celebration for kids.

●    Teen has a list of excellent Non-Fiction Resources for teens as well as Fiction.

●    If you’re interested in memoir, legal advice, politics, art, family, etc, head for the Reference Staff’s Pride at PPL: Great Non-Fiction list.

●    For film buffs, we’ve got LGBT issues in non-fiction and a suggested list of films for a Pride Film Festival.

●    Our Reader’s Advisory team offers a list that celebrates Pride at PPL: Fiction, including Stonewall Award winners as well as other complex and compelling works that tackle love, gender, sex, identity, and more. Take home a copy of Kim Fu’s just-released 2014 novel, “For Today I am a Boy;” 2013 Stonewall Winner Ellis Avery’s “The Last Nude;” or pick up a classic like Leslie Feinberg’s “Stone Butch Blues.”

Remember, these lists are just a selection of materials at the library! Sleuth our catalog or check in with the librarians and staff at the Main Branch, Burbank, Peaks, Riverton, and on the Bookmobile for more resources and information.

That’s a wrap! As always, we look forward to seeing you at PPL.

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