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AARP Tax Help

posted: , by Sonya Durney
tags: Adults | Government

AARP will once more be at PPL to help you with your taxes! 

Where:  Portland Public Library

5 Monument Square

Meeting Room #5

When: 2/4/2013– 4/9/2013

Tuesdays and Wednesdays

10:00- am – 5:30 pm

Appointments recommended, call: (207) 776-6316

AARP staff will also be at other locations throughout the Greater Portland Area from 1/31/2014 to 4/15/2014:

Mondays: South Portland City Hall, 9 to last appointment 5PM. 207-776-6316 *
American Legion Hall, Yarmouth, 12 – 4. 207-829-4675

Tuesdays: Gorham Community Center, 9 to last app’t at 12:15. 207-776-6316 *
Unity Gardens, Windham, 2 to last appointment 5:30 PM. 207-893-8170
Portland Public Library, 10 to last appointment 5:30 PM. 207-776-6316*


Wednesdays: Portland Public Library, 10 to last appointment 5:30 PM 207-776-6316*
The Woods at Canco (Portland) 9 to last appointment 12:30 207-776-6316
Westbrook Community Ctr, 4 to last appointment 7:30. 207-776-6316*                          Portland Public Library, 10 to last appointment 5:30 PM. 207-776-6316* 

Thursdays: AARP Office, 1685 Congress St. 9 to last app’t at 12:30. 207-776-6316 *
Unity Gardens, Windham, 2 to last appointment 5:30 PM. 207-893-8170
Scarborough Public Library, 4 to last appointment 6:45 207-776-6316

Fridays: Southern Maine Agency on Ageing Scarborough 9 to 1 207-396-6500

Saturdays: Westbrook Community Center, 9 to last appointment 12:30. 207-776-6316*

Select a tax preparation site. Then, call the number shown for that site and make an appointment. When you make an appointment, they will tell you all of the paperwork you need to bring with you in order to have your tax returns completed with one visit.

* These locations MAY be able to prepare return(s) for people who walk in without an appointment. Appointments always have priority! And, if opting to just walk in you may not bring all the necessary paperwork with you and have to make another trip home to get it.


No Name Calling Week

posted: , by Kim Simmons
tags: Programs & Events | Recommended Reads | Adults | Government

One Today by Richard Blanco

Last year on this date, Maine poet Richard Blanco shared his poem “One Today” at the Presidential Inauguration.  The poem reminds us of all we share :  “One ground. Our ground… ” and reminds us that our differences also shape our uniquely personal path:

All of us as vital as the one light we move through,
the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day:
equations to solve, history to question, or atoms imagined,
the “I have a dream” we keep dreaming,
or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won’t explain
the empty desks of twenty children marked absent
today, and forever.

In the end, Blanco reminds us that it is our collective vision, spirit, effort and attitude that will shape our collective future.

It is much this same message that No Name Calling Week proffers — a message to youth and adults and to the institutions within which we learn and work  to embrace kindness and make it active… to Choose Civility in a big way.  To resist a bullying culture is not just to punish those who cross the line but to develop strategies to encourage and enhance empathy in ourselves and our communities.

The GlSEN site offers many resources for engaging young people in conversations about bullying and about kindness — their suggested reading list is here.

Portland Public Library offers many provocative and helpful materials as well — a small sampling is here but a reference librarian can help you find just what you’re looking for!

Join us on Thursday January 24th for an evening of “Kindness Shorts” including winners from Kindness The Movie‘s video contest and an opportunity to watch Blanco read “One Today.”

 


Who was William Willis and What is the Willis Collection?

posted: , by Gabrielle Daniello
tags: Adults | Portland History
Photograph of the glass cases in the Portland Room that hold The Willis Collection.

The Willis Collection

Have you walked into the Portland Room and wondered about the crumbling leather-bound books behind glass that line the reading room?

These books belonged to William Willis, lawyer, editor, businessman, diarist, Portland mayor, historian…

Willis was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, in 1794. The family moved to Portland in 1803. Willis attended Harvard College, graduating in 1813, and then went on to study law under Prentiss Mellen and Boston Judge Peter O. Thacher. After a few years in Boston and a few years of travel, he returned to Portland to practice law as a partner of Mellen and, later, as a partner of William Pitt Fessenden.

Willis was an inveterate journal-keeper, writing in his diary almost daily from 1840 until 1870, the year of his death. They were not tracked down until 1957 when local historian William B. Jordan, Jr. discovered that they were in the possession of a great-grand-daughter of Willis who graciously allowed the library to take possession of them. (Library patrons can read the journals on microfilm.) In this entry from August 4,1864, Willis writes that he attended “a most loyal union discourse emphatically anti-slavery. Rain in the morning…”

Some entries from Willis' diary of August 1864.

Fragment of Willis’ diary from 1864.

The Portland Public Library also holds Willis’ own personal library. Willis was one of the founders of the Portland Public Library and served as its first president (1867-1870).

Image of the bookplate found in William Willis' personal books.

Bookplate

Somehow, despite his law practice, his responsibilities in public office and on the boards of various institutions, his nine children, and the keeping of a daily journal, Willis also managed to write history. His The History of Portland from 1632 to 1864 (published 1865) is still widely consulted by historians today.

Portrait of William Willis

William Willis

 

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