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the talk of the town

posted: , by Abraham Schechter
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Seniors | News | Portland History

It happened this day : August 1, 1939. At the brink of World War II, the battleship U.S.S. New York stopped in Portland Harbor, preparing to patrol the North Atlantic.

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On August 1, 1939, the U.S.S. New York anchored in Portland Harbor to give the men on board a week’s liberty, apparently much to the delight of the local girls, or, as an effusive reporter called them, “Portland’s pulchritudinous lassies.” The battleship carried 371 Naval Academy midshipmen, 755 enlisted men, and 57 officers who had been engaged in training exercises at sea.

EX article15454The photo above was taken near the Grand Trunk Railroad pier, along eastern Commercial Street.

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While the midshipmen enjoyed a tea dance at the Portland Country Club, readers of the Evening Express and the Portland Press Herald learned that the British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, had a “dark but still hopeful view of the international picture” (see story in the far right column). Chamberlain’s policy of appeasement would end with Hitler’s invasion of Poland, exactly one month after these photographs were taken. Britain and France declared war on Germany on September 3, 1939.

During the war, the U.S.S. New York participated in convoy operations. Once the war had ended, she served as a target during atomic bomb tests in the Marshall Islands in July of 1946, after which she was too radioactive for further service and was decommissioned.

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Here are the original camera images which were used in the Portland Evening Express article, showing crew members of the U.S.S. New York plying their musical talents, and baking in the large ship’s kitchen.

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Above: Exercising on rowing machines on deck.

Below: Writing letters home, and catching up on reading, aboard the U.S.S. New York

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For a hint of what life was like for our midshipmen in 1860, stop by the Portland Room and take a look at the Regulations of the United States Naval Academy (call number 359.0071 U58 1860)

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About Libraries

posted: , by Sarah Campbell
tags: Director's Updates | Adults | News

The variety and range of libraries and the issues that are part of their daily and strategic concerns are not always obvious to the general public.  There is not a shortage of coverage of specific issues facing libraries such as e-books, funding, etc. and occasionally there is a more general survey about the future of libraries or how they are evolving.  For national audiences, the May 14th Wall Street Journal article, “The Library’s Future Is Not an Open Book” does a fine job giving a sense of the challenges and rationale that urban libraries face nationwide and how it is being addressed through planning and architecture.  One will see echoes and demonstrations of PPL in that piece.

For Mainers seeking to understand our statewide library landscape the newest issue of the Maine Policy Review offers a wonderful blend of comment on the history, philosophy, service and strategic challenges associated with Maine’s libraries.

Made in Portland : The Café Review

posted: , by Abraham Schechter
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Seniors | News | Portland History

March is National Poetry Month, encouraging writing activities throughout the country. Among the Portland Room’s local periodical collections is the complete and ongoing run of The Café Review- now in its 21st year!

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Pictured below is Steve Luttrell, founder and publishing editor of the Review. Last year, he was named the City of Portland’s Poet Laureate.  The photo was taken here in the Portland Room, as Steve kindly gave his certificate to the Archives’ collections.

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Pictured here is the 20th Anniversary issue.  The Café Review continues to encourage local poetry-writing, and invites written and visual-art contibutions.

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