Life of the Library » Recommended Reads

What’s new?


“Participation! It’s what all my work has been about.” – Pete Seeger

posted: , by Kim Simmons
tags: Recommended Reads | Adults | Art & Culture

Pete Seeger has died at age 94.  His January 27th 2014 passing leaves a hole in the hearts of many but his legacy asks us to memorialize him by participating in our own communities and standing up for our common good with bravery, joy and music.

Learn more about Seeger by watching The Power of Song on DVD or reading a book by or about Seeger.    Or read the Smithsonian Folkways tribute to him, complete with links to music.

Watch Bruce Springstein and Pete Seeger sing This Land Is Your Land on the Lincoln Memorial steps during the inauguration of Barack Obama as President of the United States.

If you’re so moved, consider checking out a PPL Ukulele (see Teens for more info) and plucking a few famous Seeger tunes (here’s a link to a tutorial for If I Had a Hammer on Ukulele).

Commemorate Pete Seeger by choosing to participate! FMI: www.peteseegermusic.com


MONTGOMERY’S VIEW – Flora & Ulysses

posted: , by Mary Peverada
tags: Montgomery's View | Recommended Reads | Kids & Families

floraFlora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo Candlewick Press, 2013

I happily read this book a bit ago – but like Montgomery chose to ruminate before posting. Now – this book was just awarded the Newbery Award – and Kate DiCamillo has been chosen the new National Ambassador of Young People’s Literature. It is time I spread the word a little further.

Flora is a lonely girl who is obsessed with comics – her mother calls her a “natural born cynic.” But Flora’s life changes dramatically when she resuscitates a squirrel who is nearly killed in an encounter with a Ulysses 2000X vacuum cleaner. She quickly discovers that the incident has given the squirrel powers (the squirrel lifts the vacuum over his head in one paw.) Flora is reminded of her favorite comic hero the Amazing Incandesto – and her imagination helps her leap to the conclusion that the squirrel will perform great and wonderful feats. Soon the squirrel’s new abilities become even clearer as he shows his skills at understanding Flora, typing and composing poetry. Flora opens her heart totally to Ulysses. However, the squirrel’s greatest enemy is none other than Flora’s romance writing, squirrel hating mother.

DiCamillo has written a story full of heart and humor – but the quirky cast of characters give the reader even more as the author explores loneliness, accepting differences, overcoming fears, abandonment – and love. The black and white illustrations capture the mood and the comic sequences sporadically placed “illuminate” the amazing adventures of Ulysses – and augment Flora’s obsession with comics. Flora soon learns she cannot remain a cynic – once she opens herself and her heart to her squirrel.

Grades 4-6


No Name Calling Week

posted: , by Kim Simmons
tags: Programs & Events | Recommended Reads | Adults | Government

One Today by Richard Blanco

Last year on this date, Maine poet Richard Blanco shared his poem “One Today” at the Presidential Inauguration.  The poem reminds us of all we share :  “One ground. Our ground… ” and reminds us that our differences also shape our uniquely personal path:

All of us as vital as the one light we move through,
the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day:
equations to solve, history to question, or atoms imagined,
the “I have a dream” we keep dreaming,
or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won’t explain
the empty desks of twenty children marked absent
today, and forever.

In the end, Blanco reminds us that it is our collective vision, spirit, effort and attitude that will shape our collective future.

It is much this same message that No Name Calling Week proffers — a message to youth and adults and to the institutions within which we learn and work  to embrace kindness and make it active… to Choose Civility in a big way.  To resist a bullying culture is not just to punish those who cross the line but to develop strategies to encourage and enhance empathy in ourselves and our communities.

The GlSEN site offers many resources for engaging young people in conversations about bullying and about kindness — their suggested reading list is here.

Portland Public Library offers many provocative and helpful materials as well — a small sampling is here but a reference librarian can help you find just what you’re looking for!

Join us on Thursday January 24th for an evening of “Kindness Shorts” including winners from Kindness The Movie‘s video contest and an opportunity to watch Blanco read “One Today.”

 

View Posts by Date:
Filter Posts:
Connect with the Library: