All Library locations will be closed at 1pm on Wed, Dec 24, and all day Dec 25 for Christmas. We will re-open for regular hours on Fri, Dec 26.
Looking for something to read, watch, or listen to? Explore our download and streaming resources and share with friends.
X

Life of the Library » Recommended Reads

What’s new?


No Name Calling Week

posted: , by Kim Simmons
tags: Programs & Events | Recommended Reads | Adults | Government

One Today by Richard Blanco

Last year on this date, Maine poet Richard Blanco shared his poem “One Today” at the Presidential Inauguration.  The poem reminds us of all we share :  “One ground. Our ground… ” and reminds us that our differences also shape our uniquely personal path:

All of us as vital as the one light we move through,
the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day:
equations to solve, history to question, or atoms imagined,
the “I have a dream” we keep dreaming,
or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won’t explain
the empty desks of twenty children marked absent
today, and forever.

In the end, Blanco reminds us that it is our collective vision, spirit, effort and attitude that will shape our collective future.

It is much this same message that No Name Calling Week proffers — a message to youth and adults and to the institutions within which we learn and work  to embrace kindness and make it active… to Choose Civility in a big way.  To resist a bullying culture is not just to punish those who cross the line but to develop strategies to encourage and enhance empathy in ourselves and our communities.

The GlSEN site offers many resources for engaging young people in conversations about bullying and about kindness — their suggested reading list is here.

Portland Public Library offers many provocative and helpful materials as well — a small sampling is here but a reference librarian can help you find just what you’re looking for!

Join us on Thursday January 24th for an evening of “Kindness Shorts” including winners from Kindness The Movie‘s video contest and an opportunity to watch Blanco read “One Today.”

 


MONTGOMERY’S VIEW

posted: , by Mary Peverada
tags: Montgomery's View | Recommended Reads | Kids & Families

 

61i56Smw7ML._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

 

 

Doggie Dreams by Mike Herrod  Blue Apple Books, 2011

What dog owner hasn’t watched their sleeping dog and wondered: what does he dream about?  The question really arises when the dog seems to be running hard in his sleep or starts whimpering.  Does a dog dream like a human?

This early reader in graphic format (part of the Balloon Toons series) lets the reader in on some of those possible dog dreams.

The young dog owner loves his dog Jake – but Jake sleeps all of the time.  All of this sleeping makes the boy wonder – what does Jake dream about?  In his dreams – Jake is one adventurous pup.  Jake dines at a nice restaurant in one dream; he is a rock star in another; and he is a knight in shining armor in the third.  But the best dream of all is the one that Jake and his owner share – playing ball together (although the point of view may vary!)

The text is minimal.  The illustrations are colorful and appealing.  There are no more than four frames on any page (usually fewer.)  This is a gentle tale that will elicit giggles.  It is bound to lead to chat about pets – a favorite topic of children everywhere.

Won’t we all wonder – what are own pets dreaming about?

This title would be great for Preschool – to Grade 3.

(Apologies for the hiatus of Montgomery’s View for the last two months – we were lining everything up – and the book reviews will now appear each week.)


MONTGOMERY’S VIEW

posted: , by Mary Peverada
tags: Montgomery's View | Recommended Reads | Kids & Families

babesatchelSomething to Prove by Robert Skead, illustrated by Floyd Cooper  Carolrhoda Books, 2013

Becoming Babe Ruth  by Matt Tavares  Candlewick Press, 2013

The World Series is here!  For those who LOVE baseball – it doesn’t matter if you are a Cardinals fan or a Red Sox fan.  All that matters is that the Fall Classic is starting tonight. — Here’s to baseball!

In celebration of the start of the Series – let me tell you about a couple of terrific nonfiction picture books on baseball subjects that were published in the last year.

Something to Prove: The Great Satchel Paige vs Rookie Joe DiMaggio

In 1936 the New York Yankees wanted to test a “young, skinny prospect named Joe DiMaggio” to see if he could prove himself a major leaguer.  In order to test him, they needed him to go up against the best.  It was the era of segregation and black players were only allowed in the Negro Leagues – but one of those players was asked to pitch against the rookie. Satchel Paige was that player – he was the best pitcher in the Negro Leagues and probably the best pitcher in baseball.  This picture book tells the story of the day the Satchel Paige All-Stars played an exhibition game against Dick Bartell’s All-Stars (with Joe DiMaggio).

The illustrations are brown and grainy – reminiscent of 1930′s films.  Once the game starts you can almost hear the crackle of the old radio and the play-by-play announcer recounting what is unfolding in front of him for listeners everywhere.  The game went to extra innings and both players proved their talents.  The game’s tension is evoked – and the issue of race and injustice is portrayed.

Becoming Babe Ruth

This is a picture book biography of George Herman Ruth – the kid born in Baltimore that was always in trouble from a very young age.  When he was seven, his parents sent him to St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys.  Although difficult being removed from his family, the school remained a force in his life throughout his career.  It was at the school that George met Brother Matthias who awed all the boys with his hitting prowess.  Brother Matthias taught George the fine art of baseball – and sharpened the boy’s facility at the many aspects of the game. At 19 Ruth was signed by the minor-league Baltimore Orioles and soon earned his nickname as one of the new babes on the team.  His rise to stardom was swift – but he never forgot Brother Matthias and St. Mary’s.  He returned for games – and when the school burned down Ruth was there to lend support and financial aid.

Babe Ruth, the Sultan of Swat, was a larger than life celebrity before the television.  Stories of the Babe and his adventures and excesses (and they were many) were told in newspapers and by the radio baseball announcers.  This picture biography looks at Ruth’s life in baseball – and the school that remained a force in his life.  The illustrations are full of activity – and there are many portraits of George Herman Ruth that show a twinkle in the eye, a joyful soul and a kid who didn’t like rules.  The book is a tribute to a legend in the sport of baseball.

The book is written and illustrated by Maine’s own Matt Tavares.

Enjoy these books — and enjoy a great Fall Classic!

 ~Mary

View Posts by Date:
Filter Posts:
Connect with the Library: