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Portland History and Children’s Theatre of Maine

posted: , by Abraham Schechter
tags: Library Collections | Online Services | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | Portland History

Children’s Theatre of Maine, beginning in 1924, is America’s oldest continuing children’s theatrical company. Some of their earliest performances were at the Elm Theatre which stood where the eastern portion of the Portland Public Library now stands! Children’s Theatre has a history filled with colorful highlights and milestones, and these are preserved in the Archives in the Portland Room and in the Library’s Digital Commons digitized collections.

CTM is now part of the Children’s Museum and Theatre of Maine, on Free Street.

The image below shows a poster from a Children’s Theatre play in 1954, performed at Deering Oaks park.

The pictures immediately above and below were taken in 1948 (on Kodachrome film), at Redbank Village. The Children’s Theatre trailer stage even drew the attention of Life Magazine, and it was towed to Central Park for performances by the kids from Portland to New York audiences!

The above image shows a captivated audience in the 1940s, and the image below shows a Children’s Theatre member named Tony Shalhoub, helping a younger actor in 1975. Children’s Theatre history includes many celebrity actors and supporters- the latter including Bette Davis and Tony Randall.

Two images from the late 1990s – early 2000s: Above: an outdoor performance in Falmouth; Below: “The Emporer’s New Clothes,” performed at Nathan Clifford School.

Through their continuing history, Children’s Theatre has benefited from its energetic mentors. Below is an image from the early 1990s, as two young actors review a script with Lisa DiFranza.


Portland History & The Old Port

posted: , by Abraham Schechter
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Seniors | Portland History

Here is a photo of Exchange Street, in the Old Port, in 1971.

Forty years ago this year, Portland’s waterfront “warehouse district” was transformed into the “Old Port Exchange” of today.

Many of the buildings had been built in the 19th century.

The original negative, taken by a Portland Press Herald photographer, is in the Portland Room’s Archives.


Portland History and the Boston Bruins

posted: , by Abraham Schechter
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Portland History

On the momentous occasion of the Bruins’ Stanley Cup championship, here are two photographic gems from our Archives in the Portland Room.

In the photos below, published in the Portland Press Herald on November 12, 1969, Bruins star Phil Esposito is shown signing autographs at the Giant store, at Northgate Shopping Center in North Deering. Esposito had recently accomplished the record of being the first NHL player to score more than 100 points in a season.

Bruins fans may recognize that only months after these pictures were taken here in Portland, the Bruins and Phil Esposito would go on to win the Stanley Cup (1970), and again in 1972.

In the photo below, Tommy MacDowell is giving Esposito a letter to deliver which he’d written to Bruins goalie Eddie Johnston. MacDowell caddied for Johnston during the 1968 Maine Open golf tournament which was held at Riverside Golf Course in Portland.

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