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Energy Model at our Peaks Branch

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | News | Science & Technology

As part of the planned renovation of the facility that houses both our Peaks Island branch and the attached community room, we at Portland Public Library (PPL) were delighted to work with the Peaks Environmental Action Team (PEAT) and Holbrook Engineering to develop an Energy Model for the building.

Holbrook Engineering developed an energy model which can now be used to inform the final selection of building envelope choices (walls, windows, floors, ceilings, insulation) as well as choices of mechanical equipment (heating, cooling, ventilation), and lighting choices.

PEAT-PPLPeaks Island-based artist Marty Braun worked with the Library to develop a poster illustrating the decision factors that were brought forward in the energy model. The poster is now hanging in the lobby of the Peaks Island community center and appears below. A larger copy of the poster can be downloaded here.

As part of the PPL/PEAT collaboration, an energy monitor has been purchased that shows show real-time electrical use of the facility. Installation of this monitor is nearly complete in a temporary location, pending re-installation in a permanent location after renovations are complete. There will ultimately be a small display that will illustrate the components of the building envelope, and we look forward to working with PEAT to develop educational programming related to this Energy Model and the energy efficiencies that become part of the renovation.

As we enter the phase of the project where we can begin to formalize renovation plans and make choices around energy use improvements, the Library/City Planning Committee looks forward to using this data to make the informed decisions for the renovation.

 

 


Burbank Branch Update

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | News

We know many PPL patrons are eager for our Burbank Branch to reopen – we are, too! We will set the reopening date very soon, and we look forward to announcing it as soon as possible. We can’t wait to celebrate with you once we are back in the building.

Below are responses to the most frequent questions we are hearing about the current status of the renovation project. If you have feedback or other questions we can answer, please call PPL’s Administration Offices at 207-871-1700 ext. 756.

I see lots of activity at the Burbank Branch site. How is it going?

We have encountered only minimal construction delays, so we have been able to stay on schedule pretty well. As you can see from these photos, the new elevator is installed, the public computing area is coming together, and the new space is open and inviting. We will begin moving our collections and furnishings in shortly.
reno photos

How is the project funding progressing?

As we have shared previously, this is a $410,000 renovation. As is the case with every PPL capital project and our annual operational budget, the City of Portland supports PPL’s infrastructure needs. In this case, the City provided $300,000 to the project address the structural and ergonomic issues at the building.

However, we rely on the generosity of private donors for everything that enhances the Burbank library experience – from our ongoing programs, to the ways we build our collections, and the project-specific items like fresh, flexible seating in the children’s and adults areas. To date, we have received gifts from nearly 300 households toward the Burbank Branch renovation campaign and are now less than $40,000 away from our $410,000 goal.

Does this mean the project began before the funding was secure?

Not at all.

The City’s allocation meant we had the funds in hand to address long-standing, challenging structural and ergonomic issues at the branch. However, just as in a home renovation, this was an opportunity to identify other improvements that would enhance the branch and minimize future disruption:

  • new, lower-profile shelving to highlight the collection while making the space more flexible and open
  • new windows and air handling units to heighten energy efficiency
  • up-to-date public computing resources
  • more and better seating options for our patrons

Burbank Thermometer rev. 7-22How does the fundraising campaign affect the reopening of the branch?

Our hope is that gifts to the campaign will continue to keep pace with our renovation timeline and that we can reopen having accomplished all improvements rather than deferring any enhancements if we do not meet our goal. Please consider joining your neighbors in this effort, if you have not done so already, and make a secure gift online to the Burbank Branch renovation campaign. We are so grateful for the support of the community!

 


Resources for Criminal Justice Statistics

posted: , by Sonya Durney
tags: About the Library | Library Collections | Adults | Art & Culture | Government
On July 7, President Obama addressed a nation in mourning, saying in part, “If communities are mistrustful of the police, that makes those law enforcement officers who are doing a great job and are doing the right thing, it makes their lives harder. So when people say ‘Black Lives Matter,’ that doesn’t mean blue lives don’t matter; it just means all lives matter, but right now the big concern is the fact that the data shows [our emphasis added] black folks are more vulnerable to these kinds of incidents.”
The data shows.
Here are some data resources that connect you with data to better understand this multi-faceted, extremely important topic.
Criminal Justice Data / Government Issued
  • The Bureau of Justice Statistics maintains more than a dozen national data collections covering federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies and special topics in law enforcement. Most data collections are conducted every 2 to 4 years and focus on aggregate or agency-level responses, meaning the information that is collected pertains to units, such as police departments, training academies, and crime labs. Includes pages such as Use of Force.
  • The BJS published this frequently cited report Black Victims of Violent Crime (2007). While dated, the report is still frequently cited and so could be considered worth a read.
  • The FBI maintains a page of Crime Statistics and data, along with special reports.
Criminal Justice Data / Other  
There has been criticism by some, as outlined by this article  from the Harvard School of Public Health, regarding the government’s collection of data regarding some criminal justice issues. As a result, other organizations have begun alternate means of collecting data.
  • The Washington Post has compiled a Fatal Force Statistics database with stats for both 2015 and 2016. They started the project in light of the events in Ferguson, MO, in 2014. They use news reports and other public records to compile the info, and this database only registers shootings, not other deaths by force between police officers and suspect.
  • Likewise, The Guardian created a database called The Counted. This database is similar to The Washington Post datasets but includes all suspects who were killed by police, whereas the Post database focuses on shootings.
  • Law Enforcement and Violence: The Divide between Black and White Americans is based on a survey conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. This poll surveyed 1,223 adults, including 311 black adults, and was conducted online and by phone over two day in July 2015. The poll sample was drawn from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population.
  • The  Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes, and trends shaping America and the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis, and other empirical social science research. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. Read Pew reports on Race and Ethnicity or  Discrimination and Prejudice  or Divide between blacks and whites on police runs deep.
  • Opposing Viewpoints is a robust library resource that can be accessed with your PPL card. This online tools covers today’s most important social issues, such as criminal justice and race.  Its informed, differing views present various sides of an issue and help researchers develop the confidence to draw their own valid conclusions.
  • PolitiFact, a fact-checking website, concluded in August 2014 that police kill more whites than blacks citing data from the Centers for Disease Control on fatal injuries by “legal intervention” from 1999 to 2011. Read more here and link to the sources cited. PolitiFact also notes that whites make up 63% of the US population, while blacks make up just 12%.

Maine

  • Maine.gov’s webpage on Crime in Maine houses records dating back to 1995. You can contact them directly for older information. Here you will find information on crime rates, arrest data, and data on assaults on police officers.
  • Maine.gov also houses the Police Shooting Reports Archive. Here you will find the Attorney General’s Report on all police shootings in Maine.
  • The Maine.gov Statistics Portal gives quick links to Maine specific demographic and crime rate data among other fields of data.
  • The USM Muskie School has published the Maine Crime and Justice Data book (2014), which also includes sections and data on race.
  • With your PPL card you can access the Maine Newsstand and retrieve articles from the Portland Press Herald, Bangor Daily News and other local papers back to the mid-90′s.

Portland, Maine

  • You can find all public documents (annual reports, media logs, arrest records) of the Portland Police Department here. These documents are in addition to the above links that cover Maine in general.
Demographic / Census Information: 
  • To find general information on race, the US Census Bureau is a good place to look.   You can search for the percentage of persons of various races (self-identified) in the US as a whole or in specific geographies. The Census can also connect you to data on economic status, education attainment, housing status, and much more.

*Please note it is always important to look at the methodology of data collection, how the data is presented, who is collecting the data etc.

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