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Olympic Vocabulary

posted: , by Raminta Moore
tags: Library Collections | Recommended Reads | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | Health

Over the past week or so, many of us have been glued to our televisions, radios or computers rooting for our favorite Olympians. Many of the commentators are former Olympians themselves and have steeped themselves in the sport and its vocabulary. The rest of us can probably barely differentiate from a remise or a riposte or may just not understand why the runners are jumping over hurdles and small bodies of water. We are here at PPL to help you broaden your sports horizons and maybe even provide you with a few new words for your sports vocabulary or your next crossword puzzle clue. This incomplete list consists of various terms used in sports or games played in the Summer Olympics.

Archery:
fletching: (also called vanes), feathers near the end of the shaft. The fletching, which may be actual goose or turkey feathers or, especially in target arrows, may be made of plastic, make an arrow spin in flight. The spinning motion steadies the arrow and keeps it flying straight. Most arrows measure between 25 and 28 inches (63 and 70 centimeters) long.
From the Britannica Library Reference Center

For more information on Archery, check out Precision Archery

Athletics:
steeplechase: is an obstacle race, run usually over a 3000-m course containing hurdles, water jumps, and other hazards.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia

Before you put on your sneakers and head out onto the track, check out The New Rules of Running

Badminton:
shuttlecock
: traditionally a cork ball fitted with stabilizing feathers that is now sometimes made of nylon, is hit back and forth over the net with lightweight rackets. With the shuttlecock traveling at speeds up to 260 km/hr (162 mph), badminton is considered the world’s fastest racket sport.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia
Check out the Funk & Wagnalls’ article on badminton to learn about battledore, which sounds like a lot more fun or check out Better Badminton from 1939 to see if women were still required to wear skirts at that time.

Cycling and Rowing:
repechage
: a second-chance heat in cycling or rowing in which losers of the first round of competition are matched against each other for another chance to qualify for the final heat.
From Webster’s Sports Dictionary

Also check out The Boys in the Boat

Equestrian:
dressage
: In dressage, the riders guide their horses through a series of movements. There are two types of dressage, a championship test with predetermined movements and a freestyle test in which athletes choose the movements and music. In addition, there is a team test. Both men and women compete.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia

Fencing:
remise:
a second thrust at the target while still in the lunge position and with the arm still extended after an initial attack has missed that is made immediately after the opponent has parried the initial attack but before he makes a riposte or before he is able to complete the movements of a complex riposte.

riposte: a counterattack immediately following a successful parry.
From Webster’s Sports Dictionary

Also check out By the Sword

Track Cycling:
keirin:
created in Japan in 1948, this event features nine racers competing over a distance of 2km. Each racers starts in his own lane. At the starting signal, the racers struggle to catch up to a lightweight motorcycle that is already running. The motorcycle sets the pace of the race, which lasts 3 to 5 laps. When the motorcycle leaves the track at the start of the second last lap, the racers sprint to the finish.
From Sports The Complete Visual Reference

For a step back in time, come to the Portland Room at the Main library and take a look at the 1895 book, A Road Book for Cycling and Carriage Driving in Maine

This list barely scratches the surface of athletic terms used in the Games, but hopefully this list will give you a better understanding of what’s going on when your rooting for your favorite team or Olympian!

 


Riverton Branch schedule update

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | News

With the reopening of our Burbank Branch just around the corner on Tuesday, August 23, our Riverton Branch will say goodbye to visiting colleagues from Burbank who helped cover vastly increased open hours at Riverton.This means it’s time to reboot our Riverton schedule and get back to our usual 23 hours of service per week at that PPL location.

Starting Monday, August 15, we look forward to seeing you at Riverton on these days and times:

Monday: 1pm-6pm
Tuesday: closed
Wednesday: 9am-1pm
Thursday: 1pm-8pm
Friday: 9am-12pm
Saturday: 9am-1pm
There is always plenty of activity at our Riverton Branch, with everything from book groups, to story times, to crafting and more. We hope to see you in the branch as you explore our collections, enjoy our programs, and compare notes with your favorite staff members. See you soon!
Our Riverton Branch patrons are a crafty bunch!

Our Riverton Branch patrons are a crafty bunch!


Movie of the Month: One Day in September

posted: , by Patti DeLois
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Art & Culture

one day in septemberAt the beginning of the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, the Israeli athletes attended a memorial service at nearby Dachau to honor victims of the Holocaust.

Last week, in the Olympic Village in Rio de Janiero, a memorial service was held to honor the 11 members of the 1972 Israeli team who lost their lives in Munich.

Kevin Macdonald’s film One Day In September documents the 24 hours during which the so-called Olympics of Peace and Joy turned into a nightmare of terrorism that ended with the deaths of the Israelis as well as most of their captors.

In an attempt to ameliorate the embarrassment of the Berlin Olympics in 1936, which Hitler had hijacked to use as propaganda, the plan at the Munich Olympics was to present a kinder, gentler Germany, with no police or military presence in the Olympic Village. There were a handful of unarmed security guards, but not enough to prevent eight terrorists from forcing their way into the Israeli apartments and taking the athletes hostage in the early morning hours of September 5.

Using footage from live newscasts, as well as interviews with police, diplomats, the athletes’ friends and family, and the one surviving perpetrator, Macdonald recounts the horror of that day–the demands, the deadlines, the bungled rescue attempts, the whole world holding its breath. He also explores the role of the media and the Olympic Committee’s reluctance to suspend the games.

This film is not without flaws. In particular, a montage toward the end would have been more powerful without the soundtrack–at times Macdonald seems guilty of the same sensationalism with which he charges the news media–but overall this is a well-researched and thorough account of a world-changing event, one that reminds us that the purpose of the games is to foster good will and harmony among nations, and to focus on our similarities rather than our differences.

For a list of movies about sports, click here.

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