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Help is On the Way: Charitable Giving

posted: , by Sonya Durney
tags: Adults | Seniors | Art & Culture | Business | Government | News

A couple of years ago, I put together this blog post about charitable giving. Remarkably, the included links are still alive and kicking.

The instinct is strong to shake off the frustration we feel when Black Friday comes, Small Business Saturday goes, and Cyber Monday gets smaller in the rear-view mirror… if your gift list seems lame in the face of world realities, maybe the personal urge to make things better can be indulged for the good of the many. Read on:

You know you want to save the world.   You have a heart the size of our great State o’ Maine and finite finances. Where, oh, where to begin?

The good news is that there are some terrific resources out there to help you make good decisions that suit your priorities. Before your good intentions grind to a confused halt, take a look at some of these websites.

Where to start? A really terrific site to check out is Philanthropedia, Guide to Better Giving.  It is a great tool to help you focus and to understand various strategies for giving. It answers questions you may not know you have!

Sometimes you have a good idea of who you’d like to give to, but you’d like some reliable nuts-and-bolts rating information* about how they use your hard-earned donated dollars.

* Keep in mind that different sites will use different grading scales when rating nonprofits, as outlined in this TEDTalk. This one is well worth a few minutes viewing time. It presents an interesting view of nonprofits’ spending strategies.

That said, here are two sites that sort some of it out for you: Charity Navigator  and Guidestar.

These sites can also provide some focus when you know you want your donation to go toward a particular area of need, but need to find an organization that is a good fit.

It isn’t easy to know who to trust when unsolicited pleas for donations come your way. It might be a phone call, an email, something in your mailbox, or someone at your door. The Federal Trade Commission has a few things to say on the subject.

And let’s not forget that when we indulge our urge to be generous, we do so with the blessing of the US Tax Code. Here are some tips from the IRS.  Charitable giving can really pay off !

There are so many ways to make a difference. Finding what works for you can feel overwhelming. When opening your wallet seems like the best option, these resources may serve as guides. And, let’s just say it: there is nothing like the good feeling you get when you use your head to put your money where your heart is.

Happy Giving! Eileen of the Business and Government Team.


American Archives Month – Historical Research of Maine Businesses & Industries

posted: , by Cindy Dykes
tags: About the Library | Library Collections | Online Services | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Business | Portland History

The Portland Room and Archives has several resources that are useful when researching the history of a given business or industry. The Maine Register is a business directory covering the State of Maine. It is organized by county and then towns within the county. Included is a classified business index and a manufacturers’ section, which includes the names and locations of businesses as well as the names of owners or principal officers, purchasing agents and sales offices. There are also a lot of other fun facts included as well, for example, how the counties voted for governor and presidential candidates in election years, and current postage rates.

The Annual Report of the Bureau of Industrial and Labor Statistics for the State of Maine, covering 1887-1910, often contain extensive reports on industries in Maine in a given year. The 1890 edition is dedicated to agriculture and the strikes among the granite workers that year.

Another great print resource is Edward H. Elwell’s 1875 edition “The Successful Business Houses of Portland.” Organized by type of business and then business names, he gives a history of the business and goods they sell or manufacture.

guptill-store

Charles F. Guptill & Co. ca. 1910
from the Portland Room Photo Archives


Sometimes information about businesses can be gleaned from viewing the PPL’s Picture and Photo Collections.

The newspapers can be sources of information for this type of research. There are two indexes that can be used. The Jordan Index covers sixteen newspapers, primarily published in Portland, between 1785-1835. The Maine News Index covers the Press Herald newspapers between 1945-1992. After 1992, the newspapers can be found in the Maine Newsstand database.

Finally, check out PPL’s Digital Commons. Much of what you find here are abstracts of articles the Portland Room has in print. We have also digitized the 1882 Goodwin Atlas and the 1914 Richards Atlas, that show streets, addresses, footprints of buildings and what the buildings are made of, as well as a print copy of 1957 Sanborn fire insurance map.


Circulating Wifi Hotspots!

posted: , by Sonya Durney
tags: Adults | Art & Culture | Business | Careers & Jobs | Government | Health | Language Learning | Science & Technology

PPL is pleased to announce that with your Library card – you can now take the internet with you wherever you go with a wifi hotspot!

ZTE Falcon® Z-917 Hotspot

Wifi hotspots are about the size of a deck of cards and can link up to ten devices to the internet and are simple to use.

In order to place a hold visit the Library’s website.  

  •  The hotspot may be borrowed for a 1-week period. It may be renewed twice ONLY if no one is waiting for it.
  •  Checkout is limited to 1 per household.
  •  It is the policy of the Library to lend out wifi hotspots to all eligible Library patrons over the age of 18. Eligible patrons are defined as those possessing a library record in good standing (no fines or billed items, and up-to-date contact information).
  • The borrower is responsible for any loss or damage to this Wifi Hotspot.  Wifi are subject to replacement costs ($100) if the device is returned with damage that renders it inoperable or not returned 1 week beyond the loan period
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