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Language Lounge: English for Everyone

posted: , by Brandie Burrows
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Health | Language Learning
englishforeveryone

We’ve added a lot of new materials to our Adult Literacy and English Language Learning shelves. I thought I would regularly highlight some of these new materials and this week we are looking at English for Everyone. This program has multiple components and focuses on the self-learner. The first component is the print material, which includes a course book and a practice book. The course books are designed to facilitate English language learning and understanding. The practice books have additional exercises to reinforce new skills. Each unit is broken down into modules, which should be done in order.

The course is split into four levels aimed at learners at different stages. Level 1 Beginner is aimed at learners with little or no experience of English. Level 2 Beginner is for people who know the basics, but not much more. Level 3 Intermediate is for confident speakers wanting to sound more natural in a wider range of situations. And level 4 Advanced is for learners with strong English skills who want to learn colloquial English. On the back of each book you can find more information about the four levels and how they relate to the CEFR and global exam standards.

englishforeveryone3To fully take advantage of this program, learners will need to register for an account online. This allows anyone to leave the site and log back in later without losing their progress. We have found this feature really useful to learners using the Mango Language Program.

Most modules in the books have supporting audio recordings of native English speakers to help learners improve speaking and listening skills. Every module in the book is identified with a unique number to easily locate the correct audio component. Each file can be played, paused, and repeated as often as needed. Audio can be accessed online through the website, but also through the free iOS/Android app. This allows users to learn on the go.

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Another component is the ability to access exercises online for free (unfortunately there are limits on the number of free exercises available). The online exercises are interactive versions of the English for Everyone practice books.

We hope this highly visual course allows for a deeper understanding of the English language. The extensive supporting audio and exercises, both in print and online, allows for greater access for language learners.


Journaling in the Library !

posted: , by Abraham
tags: Programs & Events | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Art & Culture | Health | Language Learning | Portland History

“Group journaling transforms an enriching experience of solitude into a powerful experience of community.
~ Suzanne C. Goodsell, of Writer’s Digest.

Journaling comp
Do you keep a journal? Would you like to be able to write your own personal journal? Here’s your opportunity! The inexperienced, slightly-experienced, and experienced- of all ages are welcome! We will explore the written word together, through journaling prompts, readings, and reflection. Please bring your favorite notebooks and writing tools. Only manual (no electronic media/computers allowed!) writing methods and materials will be used: paper, pencils, pens, drawing tools- even manual typewriters- are fine. Journaling by hand frees writers to explore reflection and observation by putting ink- or graphite- to paper.

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Portland Public Library is pleased to announce Journaling in the Library, a new group that will meet monthly in the Portland Room on the 3rd Wednesday of each month from 5:30pm-7:00pm. This will be the Greater Portland region’s only writing group dedicated to journal writing, and welcomes all ages and manual writing media.

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Journaling in the Library makes use of autobiographic and historic elements in PPL’s collections: this includes memoirs, archives, journalism, letter correspondence, and the history of writing in material culture. There may be occasions for visiting writers to visit with the group, as well.

The format is similar to many other writing groups, though focused on journaling: using assigned prompts for written exploration. Participants will have opportunities to cultivate and read their writing, with the support of the community that comprises the group. Join us on Wednesday, September 21st for our first meeting!

This program is free and open to the public.

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Above: writing- at the Montague Book Mill.

Below: writing group in the Portland Room.
Telling Room Aug 2014d

(Yes, I took my typewriter to Walden Pond!)
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Olympic Vocabulary

posted: , by Raminta Moore
tags: Library Collections | Recommended Reads | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | Health

Over the past week or so, many of us have been glued to our televisions, radios or computers rooting for our favorite Olympians. Many of the commentators are former Olympians themselves and have steeped themselves in the sport and its vocabulary. The rest of us can probably barely differentiate from a remise or a riposte or may just not understand why the runners are jumping over hurdles and small bodies of water. We are here at PPL to help you broaden your sports horizons and maybe even provide you with a few new words for your sports vocabulary or your next crossword puzzle clue. This incomplete list consists of various terms used in sports or games played in the Summer Olympics.

Archery:
fletching: (also called vanes), feathers near the end of the shaft. The fletching, which may be actual goose or turkey feathers or, especially in target arrows, may be made of plastic, make an arrow spin in flight. The spinning motion steadies the arrow and keeps it flying straight. Most arrows measure between 25 and 28 inches (63 and 70 centimeters) long.
From the Britannica Library Reference Center

For more information on Archery, check out Precision Archery

Athletics:
steeplechase: is an obstacle race, run usually over a 3000-m course containing hurdles, water jumps, and other hazards.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia

Before you put on your sneakers and head out onto the track, check out The New Rules of Running

Badminton:
shuttlecock
: traditionally a cork ball fitted with stabilizing feathers that is now sometimes made of nylon, is hit back and forth over the net with lightweight rackets. With the shuttlecock traveling at speeds up to 260 km/hr (162 mph), badminton is considered the world’s fastest racket sport.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia
Check out the Funk & Wagnalls’ article on badminton to learn about battledore, which sounds like a lot more fun or check out Better Badminton from 1939 to see if women were still required to wear skirts at that time.

Cycling and Rowing:
repechage
: a second-chance heat in cycling or rowing in which losers of the first round of competition are matched against each other for another chance to qualify for the final heat.
From Webster’s Sports Dictionary

Also check out The Boys in the Boat

Equestrian:
dressage
: In dressage, the riders guide their horses through a series of movements. There are two types of dressage, a championship test with predetermined movements and a freestyle test in which athletes choose the movements and music. In addition, there is a team test. Both men and women compete.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia

Fencing:
remise:
a second thrust at the target while still in the lunge position and with the arm still extended after an initial attack has missed that is made immediately after the opponent has parried the initial attack but before he makes a riposte or before he is able to complete the movements of a complex riposte.

riposte: a counterattack immediately following a successful parry.
From Webster’s Sports Dictionary

Also check out By the Sword

Track Cycling:
keirin:
created in Japan in 1948, this event features nine racers competing over a distance of 2km. Each racers starts in his own lane. At the starting signal, the racers struggle to catch up to a lightweight motorcycle that is already running. The motorcycle sets the pace of the race, which lasts 3 to 5 laps. When the motorcycle leaves the track at the start of the second last lap, the racers sprint to the finish.
From Sports The Complete Visual Reference

For a step back in time, come to the Portland Room at the Main library and take a look at the 1895 book, A Road Book for Cycling and Carriage Driving in Maine

This list barely scratches the surface of athletic terms used in the Games, but hopefully this list will give you a better understanding of what’s going on when your rooting for your favorite team or Olympian!

 

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