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Olympic Vocabulary

posted: , by Raminta Moore
tags: Library Collections | Recommended Reads | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | Health

Over the past week or so, many of us have been glued to our televisions, radios or computers rooting for our favorite Olympians. Many of the commentators are former Olympians themselves and have steeped themselves in the sport and its vocabulary. The rest of us can probably barely differentiate from a remise or a riposte or may just not understand why the runners are jumping over hurdles and small bodies of water. We are here at PPL to help you broaden your sports horizons and maybe even provide you with a few new words for your sports vocabulary or your next crossword puzzle clue. This incomplete list consists of various terms used in sports or games played in the Summer Olympics.

Archery:
fletching: (also called vanes), feathers near the end of the shaft. The fletching, which may be actual goose or turkey feathers or, especially in target arrows, may be made of plastic, make an arrow spin in flight. The spinning motion steadies the arrow and keeps it flying straight. Most arrows measure between 25 and 28 inches (63 and 70 centimeters) long.
From the Britannica Library Reference Center

For more information on Archery, check out Precision Archery

Athletics:
steeplechase: is an obstacle race, run usually over a 3000-m course containing hurdles, water jumps, and other hazards.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia

Before you put on your sneakers and head out onto the track, check out The New Rules of Running

Badminton:
shuttlecock
: traditionally a cork ball fitted with stabilizing feathers that is now sometimes made of nylon, is hit back and forth over the net with lightweight rackets. With the shuttlecock traveling at speeds up to 260 km/hr (162 mph), badminton is considered the world’s fastest racket sport.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia
Check out the Funk & Wagnalls’ article on badminton to learn about battledore, which sounds like a lot more fun or check out Better Badminton from 1939 to see if women were still required to wear skirts at that time.

Cycling and Rowing:
repechage
: a second-chance heat in cycling or rowing in which losers of the first round of competition are matched against each other for another chance to qualify for the final heat.
From Webster’s Sports Dictionary

Also check out The Boys in the Boat

Equestrian:
dressage
: In dressage, the riders guide their horses through a series of movements. There are two types of dressage, a championship test with predetermined movements and a freestyle test in which athletes choose the movements and music. In addition, there is a team test. Both men and women compete.
From Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia

Fencing:
remise:
a second thrust at the target while still in the lunge position and with the arm still extended after an initial attack has missed that is made immediately after the opponent has parried the initial attack but before he makes a riposte or before he is able to complete the movements of a complex riposte.

riposte: a counterattack immediately following a successful parry.
From Webster’s Sports Dictionary

Also check out By the Sword

Track Cycling:
keirin:
created in Japan in 1948, this event features nine racers competing over a distance of 2km. Each racers starts in his own lane. At the starting signal, the racers struggle to catch up to a lightweight motorcycle that is already running. The motorcycle sets the pace of the race, which lasts 3 to 5 laps. When the motorcycle leaves the track at the start of the second last lap, the racers sprint to the finish.
From Sports The Complete Visual Reference

For a step back in time, come to the Portland Room at the Main library and take a look at the 1895 book, A Road Book for Cycling and Carriage Driving in Maine

This list barely scratches the surface of athletic terms used in the Games, but hopefully this list will give you a better understanding of what’s going on when your rooting for your favorite team or Olympian!

 


Circulating Wifi Hotspots!

posted: , by Sonya Durney
tags: Adults | Art & Culture | Business | Careers & Jobs | Government | Health | Language Learning | Science & Technology

PPL is pleased to announce that with your Library card – you can now take the internet with you wherever you go with a wifi hotspot!

ZTE Falcon® Z-917 Hotspot

Wifi hotspots are about the size of a deck of cards and can link up to ten devices to the internet and are simple to use.

In order to place a hold visit the Library’s website.  

  •  The hotspot may be borrowed for a 1-week period. It may be renewed twice ONLY if no one is waiting for it.
  •  Checkout is limited to 1 per household.
  •  It is the policy of the Library to lend out wifi hotspots to all eligible Library patrons over the age of 18. Eligible patrons are defined as those possessing a library record in good standing (no fines or billed items, and up-to-date contact information).
  • The borrower is responsible for any loss or damage to this Wifi Hotspot.  Wifi are subject to replacement costs ($100) if the device is returned with damage that renders it inoperable or not returned 1 week beyond the loan period

Thrive 2027

posted: , by Sarah Campbell
tags: Director's Updates | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Careers & Jobs | Government | Health

Portland Public Library staff joined scores of community partners this morning, led by United Way of Greater Portland, to celebrate the wonderful launch event for Thrive 2027, a statement of 10-year community goals for Greater Portland.

The vision for this effort, based on input from over 2,000 individuals and organizations, is to “see Greater Portland as an inclusive, caring, and collaborative community that focuses its resources strategically so that everyone grows and prospers through enhanced educational opportunities, financial stability, and healthy living.”

The three stated goals in Thrive 2027 express commitments to provide quality educational experiences for all children; and to bolster financial stability and optimal health through education, resources, and opportunities.

As your public library, we are deeply committed to provide our expertise and materials, community conversations, and special programming experiences so that everyone can discover new opportunities, learn and become informed to pursue these opportunities, and get support to navigate the systems…and THRIVE.

We’re in!

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