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Energy Model at our Peaks Branch

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | News | Science & Technology

As part of the planned renovation of the facility that houses both our Peaks Island branch and the attached community room, we at Portland Public Library (PPL) were delighted to work with the Peaks Environmental Action Team (PEAT) and Holbrook Engineering to develop an Energy Model for the building.

Holbrook Engineering developed an energy model which can now be used to inform the final selection of building envelope choices (walls, windows, floors, ceilings, insulation) as well as choices of mechanical equipment (heating, cooling, ventilation), and lighting choices.

PEAT-PPLPeaks Island-based artist Marty Braun worked with the Library to develop a poster illustrating the decision factors that were brought forward in the energy model. The poster is now hanging in the lobby of the Peaks Island community center and appears below. A larger copy of the poster can be downloaded here.

As part of the PPL/PEAT collaboration, an energy monitor has been purchased that shows show real-time electrical use of the facility. Installation of this monitor is nearly complete in a temporary location, pending re-installation in a permanent location after renovations are complete. There will ultimately be a small display that will illustrate the components of the building envelope, and we look forward to working with PEAT to develop educational programming related to this Energy Model and the energy efficiencies that become part of the renovation.

As we enter the phase of the project where we can begin to formalize renovation plans and make choices around energy use improvements, the Library/City Planning Committee looks forward to using this data to make the informed decisions for the renovation.

 

 


Burbank Branch Update

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | News

We know many PPL patrons are eager for our Burbank Branch to reopen – we are, too! We will set the reopening date very soon, and we look forward to announcing it as soon as possible. We can’t wait to celebrate with you once we are back in the building.

Below are responses to the most frequent questions we are hearing about the current status of the renovation project. If you have feedback or other questions we can answer, please call PPL’s Administration Offices at 207-871-1700 ext. 756.

I see lots of activity at the Burbank Branch site. How is it going?

We have encountered only minimal construction delays, so we have been able to stay on schedule pretty well. As you can see from these photos, the new elevator is installed, the public computing area is coming together, and the new space is open and inviting. We will begin moving our collections and furnishings in shortly.
reno photos

How is the project funding progressing?

As we have shared previously, this is a $410,000 renovation. As is the case with every PPL capital project and our annual operational budget, the City of Portland supports PPL’s infrastructure needs. In this case, the City provided $300,000 to the project address the structural and ergonomic issues at the building.

However, we rely on the generosity of private donors for everything that enhances the Burbank library experience – from our ongoing programs, to the ways we build our collections, and the project-specific items like fresh, flexible seating in the children’s and adults areas. To date, we have received gifts from nearly 300 households toward the Burbank Branch renovation campaign and are now less than $40,000 away from our $410,000 goal.

Does this mean the project began before the funding was secure?

Not at all.

The City’s allocation meant we had the funds in hand to address long-standing, challenging structural and ergonomic issues at the branch. However, just as in a home renovation, this was an opportunity to identify other improvements that would enhance the branch and minimize future disruption:

  • new, lower-profile shelving to highlight the collection while making the space more flexible and open
  • new windows and air handling units to heighten energy efficiency
  • up-to-date public computing resources
  • more and better seating options for our patrons

Burbank Thermometer rev. 7-22How does the fundraising campaign affect the reopening of the branch?

Our hope is that gifts to the campaign will continue to keep pace with our renovation timeline and that we can reopen having accomplished all improvements rather than deferring any enhancements if we do not meet our goal. Please consider joining your neighbors in this effort, if you have not done so already, and make a secure gift online to the Burbank Branch renovation campaign. We are so grateful for the support of the community!

 


Portland vs Portland: a tale of two cities

posted: , by Samantha Duckworth
tags: About the Library | Library Collections | Online Services | Programs & Events | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Art & Culture | Business | Government | News | Portland History | Science & Technology

 

portlandvsportlandlibraryedition (002)

Portland Public Library is the library serving the city of Portland, Maine. The library system serving the city on the West Coast—Portland, Oregon—is called Multnomah County Library. Yet a quick Internet search for “Portland Library” positions our library in Maine at the top of the search results —so naturally, each and every month, we get some calls or texts that baffle staff and patrons alike until geographical distinctions are sorted out. But the puzzlement usually brings a smile. Our library colleagues love swapping stories about all the confusion between PWM (Maine) and PDX (Oregon).

Here’s a collection of our favorite tales of two cities.

A message arrived recently in our Ask-A-Librarian chat box: “What are the retirement communities in Portland like? Can you send me some information about retiring in Portland?” We sent back a variety of information, including links to retirement homes and a Wall Street Journal article about the benefits of fresh sea air. The patron wrote back that they had been looking for information about Oregon, but were now considering retirement in Maine!

The Public Computing area at PPL includes 3D printing services. Patrons email us their files and we correspond with a few questions and notify them when their 3D printed item is ready to be picked up. A patron called, excitedly asking for directions to the Main Branch so he could pick up his 3D print job. The staff person on the phone gave instructions for Congress Street and Elm Street, and the patron kept asking where these streets were in relation to 10th Avenue. There is no 10th Avenue in Portland, Maine, and he sheepishly admitted he was from Oregon. The patron offered to pay shipping for his 3D print job, or asked if we could donate it to someone locally—which we did, when someone serendipitously emailed the same file to be printed later that week!

Administration gets calls so frequently for Oregon-centric directions and parking that they’re able to give directions to the Multnomah County Central Library.

A Reference Librarian was similarly fielding a directions call. The patron on the line asked where the library was in relation to Boise, Idaho, where he was driving to the library from. The librarian earnestly answered: “East!” This earned a chuckle from both ends of the call.

Both Portland Public Library and the Multnomah County Library offer hoopla (a streaming video and music service à la Netflix), but selecting “Portland Public Library” and trying to log in with your Oregon library card is liable to frustrate. One of our staff fielded a call recently from someone struggling to get their library card to work with hoopla. Asking for a library card number clears up many mysteries for us, and it was soon clear the caller was not in Maine. But after learning he’d reached the wrong library in the wrong state, the caller was completely unfazed and asked for help with downloading his title anyway. Our staff member walked him through finding and selecting “Multnomah County Library” on the menu for hoopla access. We love our Oregon patrons, too!

A Reference Librarian spent a considerable amount of time on the phone with a person looking for a title that was available at PPL’s Burbank branch. Since the patron didn’t know where Burbank was, he asked if the book could be sent to Hillsdale instead. “Where are you calling from, sir?” concluded that call.

PPL receives advance copies of books from publishers that they think we might be interested in purchasing eventually. Our selector shelves frequently contain beautiful books about the Pacific Northwest, Vancouver travel, and Oregon history. The ME in PPL’s address must not have been a tip-off when these gracious publishers addressed their packages. We’ve been wondering if Multnomah County Librarians get advance copies of books on lighthouses in New England.

The Chat with a Librarian service at PPL gets so many questions asking for the city on the West Coast, we have a saved response:

textalib

While it is clear to us here in Maine that our Portland should be the first one that comes to mind—Portland, ME was founded in 1786 after all, more than fifty years before Portland, OR—Portland East Coast is still more than eight times smaller than Portland West Coast. That’s a population of 66,194 versus a population of…583,776. (Thus: so many more people with questions needing answers!) Why aren’t callers tipped off by the 207 area code when they’re dialing the number for the “Portland library”? Maine only has one area code, so all calls are local calls in Maine. Oregon, though, has four area codes, so 207 might just get lost in the shuffle.

Besides our names, Portland and Portland have a lot in common. Portland seems to be the coffee capital on the East Coast and on the West Coast; one travel site calls PWM the beer capital of the world, while CNN gives this distinction to PDX. PWM has a growing housing problem: PDX too.  We also care about being sustainable cities—Portland, ME has a sustainability initiative, as does  Portland, OR. Most importantly? Both Portland libraries have a history of awesome Bookmobiles (see below).

We love to think that the work we do in Maine affects people all the way across the country. Since we’re three hours ahead, it’s nice to imagine that while our West Coast colleagues are busy waking up and getting their library open, we’re picking up some of their urgent calls—and likewise, maybe after PPL closes for the evening, the other Portland is helping keep our night owls stocked with eBooks.

In the meanwhile, if anyone needs directions to the library in Portland, England, or Portland, Australia—we’re ready!

bookmobile multnomah county (002)

 

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