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Videoport gift doubles PPL’s DVD collection

posted: , by Emily Levine
tags: About the Library | Director's Updates | Library Collections | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture | News

Long-time Portland movie resource Videoport has announced that the store will cease operation in late August after 28 years serving the community. As part of the closing process, Videoport owner Bill Duggan has worked with Portland Public Library to donate the store’s collection of more than 18,000 DVD titles. The gift effectively doubles the Library’s existing DVD collection, adding tremendous depth to the resources available to patrons. “We are pleased PPL is going to to take on the Videoport collection and keep it available to all,” said Duggan

“Videoport has had a unique and important impact in the Portland community with its high-quality, wonderfully diverse collection, and we are sorry to see it close its doors,” says PPL Executive Director Sarah Campbell. “We are so grateful that Videoport has chosen to make this gift to the Library, and plans are underway to incorporate their collection into the PPL holdings as quickly as possible. We know our patrons will benefit tremendously from this gift.”

In addition to its DVD collection, PPL offers video streaming service via Hoopla and also hosts regular film screenings and film festivals. “Our patrons and visitors value film as a way to experience great stories, and to engage with ideas and with their community,” Campbell said. “We hope that as dedicated Videoport customers access these holdings at PPL, they will also enjoy our film-related programs and will share in these events.”

Guess the New Tool Coming to PPL!

posted: , by Samantha Soucy
tags: About the Library | Library Collections | Programs & Events | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Science & Technology

In anticipation of the Library’s maker fair happening later this month, our staff have been hard at work getting together an arsenal of tools to unveil. While a few of them will stay complete surprises, we can’t contain our excitement over our newest tool. It is currently living in the IT department, getting polished and prepped so it can be wheeled out into the community on April 25th.

Here are a few clues about this new piece of our technology collection. Read the clues below to try and figure out what we’ll be introducing,

  • The ink for this machine is known as filament
  • The creation of a raft is a necessary step before your project really begins with this tool
  • The first commercially available model of this tool was called Cupcake
  • File format .STL is the most compatible format with this tool
  • Different tools vary slightly on the process for utilization, PPL’s new tool uses fused deposition modeling

If you think you correctly guessed the new tool using these facts, email: to verify, and then come to the maker fair on 4/25 to claim your prize!

Librarians <3 Neutrality

posted: , by Samantha Soucy
tags: About the Library | Library Collections | Online Services | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Government | News | Science & Technology

There is one word that makes a librarian especially happy, and yesterday it was said again and again. “Neutrality” was the word of the day, as the Federal Communications Commission agreed to recognize Internet infrastructure as a public utility. This is exciting news. It has been an issue for over 10 years, starting in 2005 when the FCC voted to reclassify DSL broadband service, away from being an “information service” to instead be called a “telecommunications service,” effectively allowing Internet service providers to hide their infrastructure allowing it to be riddled with unfair practices.

But yesterday’s decision ensures that access to the Internet will be based on fair and equitable practices. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler says: “the landmark open-Internet protections that we adopted today should reassure consumers, innovators and financial markets about the broadband future of our nation.”

So, next time you access Netflix, Twitter, Google, or one of Portland Public Library’s own digital resources, rest assured you’ll be connecting to each of these sites with the same network speeds available—not faster tiered levels of service (with companies paying for higher speeds) that prioritize network traffic to ensure streaming services are better quality and pages load faster.

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