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Videoport Science Fiction in Circulation

posted: , by Patti DeLois
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture

the flyFor the month of July, our DVD display shelf will feature science fiction movies recently added from the Videoport collection.

In addition, the remaining sci-fi/fantasy films in our warehouse are now available to be requested.

All your Star Trek movies. Your Highlanders, your Outlanders, your Planets of the Apes. Your Soylent Greens. Your Close Encounters. Your Jasons and your Argonauts.

Don’t know where to begin? Check out these recommendations.


New Website Navigation Bar

posted: , by Kathleen Spahn
tags: About the Library | Online Services | Adults | Kids & Families | Seniors

As part of a larger plan to make our website more accessible on tablets and smartphones, the Library is launching some changes to the blue navigation bar at the top of the pages. As part of these changes the patron account information known as “My PPL” has moved to the top right corner of the page. Now there is just one place to go for all your patron information: borrowing/renewing, lists, profile, and settings.

You’ll also notice that drop-down menus no longer appear when you hover over them. Instead, when you click on a tab the menu drops down and stays down until you make a selection.

A few other highlights include:

  • “Using the Library” has been renamed “How do I…” and includes a link to the Classic Catalog.
  • We are putting greater emphasis on our electronic resources elibraryby featuring them under a new tab labeled “eLibrary”. The Library invests in a wide variety of content – streaming video & music, audiobooks, and eBooks, language learning and test-taking practice, and of course research databases – all available from anywhere 24/7. We hope that by increasing their visibility we will increase the number of people who discover and make use of them.
  • The Locations tab now includes more detail about the Main Library to give greater visibility to the Lewis Art Gallery and the Portland History Room.
  • A new “For You” tab lists Adults, Teens, and Children & Families at the top level.
  • Under Programs & Events, we have included a new direct link to Book Groups so these can be found more easily!

All the catalog and patron pages will be completely responsive now, meaning they will resize and be optimized for working well on any size screen — from phone to computer. We plan to make similar changes to some of our other pages over time. Until then we hope this will improve your experience with our website no matter how you reach us.


From Rome to the Replacements: June Staff Picks

posted: , by Elizabeth Hartsig
tags: Library Collections | Recommended Reads | Adults | Seniors | Art & Culture

June staff picks (1)


Film


 

june3

Gabrielle’s Pick

The Salt of Life, directed by Gianni Di Gregorio

What happens when an aging Italian filmmaker realizes that women no longer look at him with desire? He makes a film about the experience, of course.

Gianni e Le Donne, or The Salt of Life, is a semi-autobiographical film that follows the film’s hero, played by the filmmaker himself, in his hapless (yet always polite) attempts at romance and flirtation. Charming, poignant, slightly melancholy, and funny in a poker-faced way, the movie is also a feast for the eyes with its lovely scenes of Rome.

 


Nonfiction


Audre Lorde in a film still from director Dagmar Schultz's "The Berlin Years: 1984-1992."

Audre Lorde in a film still from director Dagmar Schultz’s “The Berlin Years: 1984-1992.”

Elizabeth’s Pick

Sister Outsider was published in June of 1984, and more than thirty years on, Audre Lorde’s essays and speeches around racism, sexism, homophobia, and on many other themes—women’s relationships, anger vs hatred, communication, responsibility, love—remain as powerful and empowering as ever.

From The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action

“I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood. That the speaking profits me, beyond any other effect… 

And of course I am afraid, because the transformation of silence into language and action is an act of self-revelation, and that always seems fraught with danger… 

In the cause of silence, each of us draws the face of her own fear- fear of contempt, of censure, or some judgment, or recognition, of challenge, of annihilation. But most of all, I think, we fear the visibility without which we cannot truly live. 

…For we have been socialized to respect fear more than our own needs for language and definition… 

The fact that we are here and that I speak these words is an attempt to break that silence and bridge some of those differences between us, for it is not difference which immobilizes us, but silence. And there are so many silences to be broken.”

Lorde died of cancer in 1992. Re-reading her work this June, I wonder what she might write about today…reflecting and calling as strongly as ever for individuals and communities to grow, break silence, recognize, and hear one another?

 


Fiction


Brandie’s Pick

june2Homegoing, by Yaa Gyasi

“We believe the one who has the power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So, when you study history, you must always ask yourself, whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth?” 

I don’t know the last time I read something that I loved as much as Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. This happens to be her debut novel, which blows me away. If you love family sagas that make the family trees in the opening pages necessary to refer to, this is the book for you.

Gyasi, who was born in Ghana and immigrated to the United States with her family at the age of 2, said she was initially inspired to write this book after she visited the Cape Coast Castle. In Homegoing she introduces us to Effia and Esi, half-sisters born in 18th-century West Africa. While Effia becomes the bride of a British slave-trader and goes to live in the Cape Coast Castle, Esi become a slave living in the dungeons of the castle awaiting the trip to the New World. Homegoing then follows generations of their descendants, free and enslaved, on both sides of the ocean. Each chapter follows the story of a different character, moving forward in time from one generation to the next. From these stories of Effia and Esi’s descendants grow “two branches split from the same tree.”

Extraordinary for its beautiful language, Homegoing is a portrait of what it means to belong, both to a nation and to a family, and the forces that shape those nations and families. Gyasi packs so much into each of the short chapters and she accomplishes it all with the astounding efficiency of just 300 pages. Trust me, you won’t be able to put this book down.

“Weakness is treating someone as though they belong to you. Strength is knowing that everyone belongs to themselves.” 


Eileen’s Pick

june1Thomas Murphy, by Roger Rosenblatt

When I read Roger Rosenblatt’s work of fiction Thomas Murphy, pre-Orlando but post- so many other, earlier mankind-vs-itself horrors, this quote grabbed me.  It is posted desk-side where I can read it anytime my eyes wander from workaday whatevers:

That’s all civil rights means anyway—returning to a state of natural dignity.  The movements are called revolutionary, but they are really restorative.”   

The italics are mine because important things assume italic formation in my head, but the bold-ness of the statement (if not of the typeface) comes from the main character, Thomas Murphy himself.

Thomas is a character, all right: a poet whose memory is likely failing (he awaits clinical proof), possessor of a meandering mode of expression (oh! how I love a fellow meanderer!), blessed and cursed with a cast of acquaintances, living and dead, that makes for an extraordinary ordinary life.  For a fictional fella, he makes more sense than he ought.

Perhaps it is only in fiction that a statement of the obvious, like his regarding civil rights, can hope to stand without assault.   Perhaps it is up to real folk like us to take his assertion into the world and see the sense it makes.

Fiction is a vehicle for truth.  Nonfiction can mislead.  Tragedies are tragic.  Love is love.  We are what we are.  We all yearn for the restoration of our natural dignity.

 


Music


Hazel’s Picks

 The Replacements’ golden age: Let It Be (1984), Tim (1985), Pleased to Meet Me (1987) [Recommended if you: are 15-25, have ever been 15-25, are already mourning the fact that we are on the wrong side of the summer solstice]

Imagine that Peter Pan wakes up in Neverland one day feeling uncertain about his signature stance on adulthood, and the only way he can process this identity crisis is to make three jangly punk records. I go through regular phases where the only albums I want to listen to are these, preferably while driving, windows down. Bonus points for sunglasses that make me feel tough, but like, in a sensitive way. These smart and bittersweet power pop classics are available to stream with your library card via Hoopla along with the rest of the Replacements’ catalogue. (If you prefer CDs, Let It Be and Pleased to Meet Me can be found in PPL’s collection, but you’ll have to go through ILL to get your hands on Tim, my personal favorite).

June staff picks (1)


As always, thanks for reading.

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