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Remembering The Greatest

posted: , by Patti DeLois
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Teens | Kids & Families | Seniors | Art & Culture

the GreatestIn a 1975 interview with Playboy, Muhammad Ali said:

“I’ll tell you how I’d like to be remembered: as a black man who won the heavyweight title and who was humorous and who treated everyone right. As a man who never looked down on those who looked up to him and who helped as many of his people as he could–financially and also in their fight for freedom, justice and equality. As a man who wouldn’t hurt his people’s dignity by doing anything that would embarrass them. As a man who tried to unite his people through the faith of Islam that he found when he listened to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. And if all that’s asking too much, then I guess I’d settle for being remembered only as a great boxing champion who became a preacher and a champion of his people. And I wouldn’t even mind if folks forgot how pretty I was.”

We believe Ali will be remembered exactly as he wanted to be. He was a man of uncompromising principles and convictions, an inspiration to people all over the world. Stripped of his title, threatened with imprisonment, openly mocked and reviled, he never backed down, and he never gave up his fight for justice, equality, and peace.

Fortunately for us, he lived in a time when all of his work and achievements could be well documented, so we’ll never forget his strength, his courage, his determination.

Nor will we ever forget how pretty he was.

 

For a list of materials about Ali, click here.

 

 

 


Movie of the Month: Changeling

posted: , by Patti DeLois
tags: Library Collections | Adults | Teens | Seniors | Art & Culture

ChangelingLos Angeles, 1928. A single mother named Christine Collins returns home from work to find that her son, nine-year-old Walter, is missing.

A few months later, the police inform her that Walter has been found alive in Illinois, and they gather the media to witness the joyous reunion. In fact the reunion is a publicity stunt, meant to counteract the perception of corruption within the police force. Collins is prepared to play her role as the relieved and grateful mother, but there’s one problem: This child is not Walter.

So determined is the LAPD to preserve their image as honest and helpful that they do all they can to persuade Collins to just accept the child as her own and shut up about it. When she refuses to do that, they attempt to discredit her, ultimately having her declared insane and committing her to an asylum.

Folks, this is a true story.

Meticulously researched by J. Michael Straczynski, who wrote the screenplay. Directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Angelina Jolie in one of her most heartbreaking performances.

 

Join us on Thursday evenings for our Mothers in the Movies series, and choose a Mother’s Day movie from our recommended list.

 

 

 

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