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Lewis Gallery

Maine has a rich heritage of fiddling that encompasses Yankee, Franco-American, and, to a lesser extent, Irish-American cultures. The exhibit will explore and celebrate this heritage by bringing together a wide range of materials—photographs, printed and manuscript tunebooks, sound recordings, concert flyers, and dance cards—that document the Pine Tree State’s vibrant fiddling traditions. Maine has also been home to a surprising number of fiddle makers; researchers have identified close to 200 professional and amateur craftspeople in Maine who have made violins. Examples of the work of several of these are included in the exhibit.Curators of the exhibit are Paul F. Wells, Director Emeritus of the Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University, and Tom Wilsbach, Arts Librarian at the Portland Public Library. Wilsbach and Wells are both fiddlers and fiddle researchers. The exhibit will hang through June and July. Associated events, including lectures and performances will take place during the exhibit’s run.- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/wicked-good-fiddling-200-years-fiddling-fiddlers-fiddle-making-maine/#sthash.SsbaGJyE.dpuf
Maine has a rich heritage of fiddling that encompasses Yankee, Franco-American, and, to a lesser extent, Irish-American cultures. The exhibit will explore and celebrate this heritage by bringing together a wide range of materials—photographs, printed and manuscript tunebooks, sound recordings, concert flyers, and dance cards—that document the Pine Tree State’s vibrant fiddling traditions. Maine has also been home to a surprising number of fiddle makers; researchers have identified close to 200 professional and amateur craftspeople in Maine who have made violins. Examples of the work of several of these are included in the exhibit.Curators of the exhibit are Paul F. Wells, Director Emeritus of the Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University, and Tom Wilsbach, Arts Librarian at the Portland Public Library. Wilsbach and Wells are both fiddlers and fiddle researchers. The exhibit will hang through June and July. Associated events, including lectures and performances will take place during the exhibit’s run.- See more at: http://www.portlandlibrary.com/events/wicked-good-fiddling-200-years-fiddling-fiddlers-fiddle-making-maine/#sthash.01kwJmUH.dpuZanzibar Henna Artists:  Innovation on a Cultural Tradition

Now & Then: PPL’s Collection Reconfigured
Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Library
June 2 through July 22, 2017
in the Lewis Gallery

 

Many thanks to People’s United Bank for their sponsorship support of “Now & Then.”

Now & Then: Portland Public Library’s Collection Reconfigured brings together nine local artists who were asked to respond to works within our collection through their own lens to highlight the library’s permanent art collection including the curiosities within the archives. From nineteenth century portraits of Portland’s preeminent philanthropists to Victorian Era fashion books, from age worn maps to grand oil paintings of seascapes, the artists of Now & Then were, at first glance, confronted by a collection that seemed random and mismatched. On closer inspection, however, the collection ties together much about the civic and cultural past of our community. Many of the artists used pieces in our art collection as a launching off point to discover more about the cultural and historical significance of each, working with librarians to track down information and utilizing the many resources Portland Public Library has to offer curious and inquiring minds.

Now & Then includes works by Kenny Cole, Ellen Gutekunst, Séan Alonzo Harris, Larry Hayden, Alison Hildreth, Devon Kelley-Yurdin, Mike Marks, Mitchell Rasor, and Julie Poitras Santos. The posters were designed and printed by Pickwick artists.

 

 

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Southgate Faces: Faces and Voices from an American Shipyard
August 4 through September 22, 2017
in the Lewis Gallery

Portland Public Library hosts an exciting new exhibit in conjunction with the Maine Maritime Museum in the Lewis Gallery, August 4 through 22, 2017.  Curious about the gritty, hardhat-wearing workers at a shipyard in their own backyard, Heather Perry and Hopper McDonough from Bath, Maine set out to document the faces and voices of a blue-collar culture existing in their blind spot. Bath Iron Works is one of the nation’s oldest shipyards, and is currently Maine’s 3rd largest employer, where 6000 workers build some of the US Navy’s most technologically advanced warships.

The Yard has a signature of massive buildings and towering cranes on a mile of Kennebec River waterfront. The Southgate, one of three entrances to the highly secure facility, is where many of the welders, pipe fitters, painters, marine electricians, ship fitters, and insulators congregate between shifts and during breaks. It’s a place where these union workers refer to themselves as brothers and sisters, and the Southgate is their turf. Just beyond the gate, photographer Heather Perry and audiographer Hopper McDonough set up a portable photo studio to catch the workers on their 30 minute break and convinced them to step inside to be photographed and interviewed.

You can see more of this work at www.southgatefaces.com.

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Lewis Gallery Exhibit Guidelines

The Lewis Gallery at Portland Public Library is a large and open gallery that has 75 feet of wall space, a soaring entry, track lighting, and great public visibility. Voted the Portland Phoenix’s Best Non-Gallery Art Space 2013, the Lewis Gallery is a space that attracts visitors and encourages public engagement with art.

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

If you are interested in exhibiting your work, please review our art exhibit guidelines and submit a proposal using the Lewis Gallery proposal form.

The Library’s Cultural Center Team reviews exhibit proposals on a quarterly basis and selects shows based on a goal of attaining a mix of mediums and content for the gallery. Submitting a proposal form does not ensure that a show will be hosted in the Lewis Gallery.